# Generating Forms

Form generation is a first-class feature of Vue Formulate, and can be accomplished in two ways:

The above methods are very similar — both utilize arrays of objects with prop values. This works really well since Vue Formulate is a component-first library, where nearly all of the functionality is accessible via props. Additionally, features like slot components allow for customization of the inputs being rendered without needing to bring-your-own components (although you can).

# Schemas

Schemas were introduced in version 2.4 and allow for generating complex forms with group fields, wrappers, and your own components. Showing is better than telling, so here’s an interactive JSON playground with several examples. We’ll go into more detail on the structure of the schemas after this.

# Interactive JSON playground

# Schema inputs

Schemas are simply arrays of objects, where each object represents the props to give to the generated component or tag. Objects in a schema are assumed to be FormulateInput components by default. In fact, the simplest valid schema is just an array with an empty object [ {} ] which renders to an empty text field.

These schema arrays can be passed directly as a prop to <FormulateForm> or to <FormulateSchema>. Since <FormulateForm> adds model binding, it’s most convenient unless you have advanced needs.

<template>
  <FormulateForm
    v-model="values"
    :schema="schema"
  />
</template>

<script>
export default {
  data () {
    return {
      values: {},
      schema: [
        {
          type: 'password',
          name: 'password',
          label: 'Enter a new password',
          validation: 'required'
        },
        {
          type: 'password',
          name: 'password_confirm',
          label: 'Confirm your password',
          validation: '^required|confirm:password',
          validationName: 'Password confirmation'
        },
        {
          type: 'submit',
          label: 'Change password'
        }
      ]
    }
  }
}
</script>

# Schema components

Schemas are not limited to FormulateInput elements. Each object can define a component property to specify any component or HTML tag to render.

[
  {
    component: 'img',
    src: '/logo.svg',
    style: 'width: 50px;'
  },
  {
    component: 'Badge',
    text: '2.4.0'
  },
]
2.4.0

# Schema children

The final piece of the puzzle is the ability to nest schemas. For example, you might want to wrap two elements, or use a group input. There is no limit to the depth or size of your schema.

[
  {
    type: 'group',
    repeatable: true,
    name: 'addresses',
    addLabel: '+ Address',
    children: [
      {
        name: 'street',
        label: 'Street address'
      },
      {
        name: 'city',
        label: 'City',
      },
      {
        component: 'div',
        class: 'double-row',
        children: [
          {
            name: 'state',
            type: 'select',
            label: 'State',
            options: {
              va: 'Virginia',
              fl: 'Florida',
              ne: 'Nebraska',
              ca: 'California'
            },
          },
          {
            name: 'zip',
            label: 'Zip',
          },
        ]
      }
    ]
  }
]
Remove

# Schema events 2.5

Schemas also support event bindings. There are three ways to bind events to your schema:

  • Simple event listeners
  • Renamed event listeners
  • Inline functions

# Simple event listeners

Binding an event to a schema element is as simple as including an @{eventName} property on an element. For example, given this schema:

[
  {
    "type": "text",
    "name": "username",
    "@blur": true
  }
]

We can now listen for the blur event on username by adding an event listener to the <FormulateForm> or <FormulateSchema> element:

<FormulateForm
  :schema="schema"
  @blur="handleBlur"
/>

# Renamed event listeners

Simple event listeners work great when you only need to listen to one or two events in your schema, but what happens when you need to listen to several events on multiple schema nodes? For example, if every input in a long form listened to the @focus event, it could be frustrating to determine which input had been focused.

To solve for this, you can rename the emitted event by simply providing a new event name as the value of your @{eventName} property. You can choose any string (kebab-case is recommended). For example:

[
  {
    "label": "Select a username",
    "type": "text",
    "name": "username",
    "@focus": "focus-username"
  },
  {
    "label": "Select a password",
    "type": "password",
    "name": "password",
    "@focus": "focus-password"
  },
  {
    "label": "Confirm your password",
    "validation": "confirm",
    "type": "password",
    "name": "password_confirm",
    "@focus": "focus-confirm"
  }
]
<FormulateForm
  :schema="schema"
  @focus-username="focusedOn = 'username'"
  @focus-password="focusedOn = 'password'"
  @focus-confirm="focusedOn = 'confirm'"
>
  Now we know the last focus was <strong>{{ focusedOn }}</strong>
</FormulateForm>
Now we know the last focus was Not yet focused

# Inline functions

It is also possible to bind event listener functions directly into your schema. This option (obviously) won't work with simple JSON, but it works great if you are storing your schema in your component, or if you export your schema from a JavaScript file.

export default [
  {
    label: 'Where would you prefer to live?',
    type: 'select',
    name: 'location',
    options: ['Cleveland', 'Fiji', 'San Francisco',],
    '@change': (e) => e.target.value === 'Fiji' ? alert('🏝') : alert('🤔')
  }
]

# Simple iteration

Because Vue Formulate stresses a single input API, it makes DIY form-generation simple. In its simplest form, all you need is an array of objects you want to represent inputs.

<template>
  <FormulateForm>
    <FormulateInput
      v-for="item in items"
      :key="item.name"
      v-bind="item"
    />
  </FormulateForm>
</template>

<script>
export default {
  data () {
    return {
      items: [
        {
          name: 'email',
          label: 'Your email',
          validation 'required|email'
        }
      ]
    }
  }
}
</script>

This simple feature can actually produce fairly robust forms since you have full control of your inputs via props:

JSON source
[
  {
    type: 'text',
    name: 'name',
    label: 'What is your name?',
    placeholder: 'Your name...',
    validation: 'required'
  },
  {
    type: 'text',
    name: 'address',
    label: 'What is your street address?',
    placeholder: 'Your address...',
    help: 'Where would you like your product shipped?',
    validation: 'required'
  },
  {
    type: 'radio',
    name: 'method',
    label: 'What shipping method would you like?',
    options: [
      { value: 'fedex_overnight', id: 'fedex_overnight', label: 'FedEx overnight' },
      { value: 'fedex_ground', id: 'fedex_ground', label: 'FedEx ground' },
      { value: 'usps', id: 'usps', label: 'US Postal Service' }
    ],
    value: 'fedex_ground',
    'validation-name': 'Shipping method',
    validation: 'required'
  },
  {
    name: 'submit',
    type: 'submit',
    label: 'Submit order'
  }
]
Where would you like your product shipped?